That's what SHE said: pimp-shaming, having it all, looking smarter, being happy, and more . . .


Lieutenant Kevin Wiley oversees the Department’s human trafficking operations and describes Oakland as “the hub of the West for child prostitution.” Oakland and eastern counterpart Atlanta, he says, tend to be entry points into “the circuit,” a human trafficking ring that cycles victims around the country. While it may seem controversial to publicly display individuals’ photos alongside abhorred crimes before they’ve been convicted, Wiley emphasizes that at the arrest stage, the information is already a public record. The Department, he says, waits until the Alameda County District Attorney has investigated and charged the individuals before brandishing their likenesses on the Internet.


10 Tricks To Appear Smart During Meetings | Medium
Whenever someone gets up from the table and walks around, don’t you immediately respect them? I know I do. It takes a lot of guts but once you do it, you immediately appear smart. Fold your arms. Walk around. Go to the corner and lean against the wall. Take a deep, contemplative sigh. Trust me, everyone will be shitting their pants wondering what you’re thinking. If only they knew (bacon).


Why PepsiCo CEO Indra K. Nooyi Can't Have It All | The Atlantic
I don’t think women can have it all. I just don’t think so. We pretend we have it all. We pretend we can have it all. My husband and I have been married for 34 years. And we have two daughters. And every day you have to make a decision about whether you are going to be a wife or a mother, in fact many times during the day you have to make those decisions. And you have to co-opt a lot of people to help you. We co-opted our families to help us. We plan our lives meticulously so we can be decent parents. But if you ask our daughters, I’m not sure they will say that I’ve been a good mom. I’m not sure.



People interested in social justice often have a way of fetishizing the causes we think we’re supporting in a way that furthers the problem, whether objectifying black men’s or plus-size women’s bodies. That’s not to say that we should ignore a woman’s size altogether, because as writer Lisa C. Knisely reminds us “the fucking worst thing you can tell a fat girl is that she isn’t fat,” but pointing it out in a cutesy, wink-wink, oh-we-get-it way might serve to make people feel infantilized or emphasize being treated differently. We need to celebrate people’s bodies for the right reasons.

There's More To Life Than Being Happy | The Atlantic
Nearly a quarter of Americans feel neutral or do not have a strong sense of what makes their lives meaningful. Research has shown that having purpose and meaning in life increases overall well-being and life satisfaction, improves mental and physical health, enhances resiliency, enhances self-esteem, and decreases the chances of depression. On top of that, the single-minded pursuit of happiness is ironically leaving people less happy, according to recent research. “It is the very pursuit of happiness,” Frankl knew, “that thwarts happiness.”


White High School Drop-Outs Are As Likely To Land Jobs As Black College Students | Forbes
The report ventures numerous theories to explain the employment gap between the races and a list of proposed solutions. Persistent racial discrimination in hiring is one obvious cause. The high incarceration rate among African-Americans is another reason, says the report, citing a 2014 Brookings study showing that there is nearly a 70% chance that an African-American male without a high school diploma will be in prison by his mid 30s; having a criminal record makes it much tougher to find a job. The report also suggests that the wealth gap between whites and blacks undermines African-Americans’ ability to be job ready. In a 2012 Forbes.com story, Emory University tax law professor Dorothy Brown wrote that the median net worth of white households was 20 times greater than that of black households.

An Adopted Child’s View Of The Christian Adoption Movement | I Am Not The Babysitter
Adoption abuse cases from Ethiopia (most recently, Hana’s story and the case of the Barbour’s) have been making me think a lot about my evolving views on adoption. It’s hard to look at my beautiful, loving family and sit in the question. Our decision to adopt is not something we regret..not by a long shot. However, the more we learn about the ethics of adoption (both international and domestic), the more we want to spread the important message of family preservation whenever possible. This is something we have to live with as a family, so we move forward in other ways.




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