That's what SHE said: white fragility, hovering parents and marriage, genetic curiosities, parenting as a Gen-Xer, and more . . .

Black Is The New Black: White Privilege And White Fragility | SpokaneFAVS
Just as sexual violence is a male problem, so too is racism a white problem. White Americans are complicit in — and the primary beneficiaries of — a system that dehumanizes and erases black lives. If Howard Zinn is correct that “our problem is civil obedience,” we white Americans ought to reflect on how we might protest in order to change a system that perpetuates misery for so many. Such protest is imperative for Christians who want their lives to reflect the Jesus they claim to worship.

How American Parenting Is Killing The American Marriage | Quartz
There are doubtless benefits that come from elevating parenthood to the status of a religion, but there are obvious pitfalls as well. Parents who do not feel free to express their feelings honestly are less likely to resolve problems at home. Children who are raised to believe that they are the center of the universe have a tough time when their special status erodes as they approach adulthood. Most troubling of all, couples who live entirely child-centric lives can lose touch with one another to the point where they have nothing left to say to one another when the kids leave home.

Genetics, Adoption And First World Curiosities | Angela Tucker
When I met my birthfather after being introduced to Bryan he replied; “It’s good ta meet’cha Bryan. B-R-Y-A-N, Bryan” spelling his name out loud. At that moment my mom and I exchanged long glances silently flashing back to all of the times I spelled out words just for the sake of spelling out the word. Throughout my childhood we thought this habit was to help me to more clearly understand the word as my hearing loss made it difficult to hear the difference between the words “curb” and “curve.” But now…now I wonder – could this be genetic?

American Girls’ Journey “Home” In Rural China | The Broad Side
“I felt at home,” Jennie wrote in her college application essay, “because even though I had no memories of Xixiashu, I finally fit in with the majority. After years of being surrounded by people who do not look like me, I was able to recognize physical features that were similar to mine.” For Maya, her time with Chinese friends helped her to frame questions about her identity given the duality of her life. She wrote: “’So, what are you?’ the girls asked me. ‘You look Chinese on the outside but you are American on the inside.’ At first, I detested this description. If the substance of my being is not Chinese, I might as well be white. Once content with describing myself as ‘Chinese American,’ now I was hit with its vagueness. Where do I belong between being Chinese and becoming American?” 

Stanford Psychologist MacArthur Genius On Racism | Business Insider
"It’s almost as though blackness is so associated with crime that you’re ready to pick out these crime objects out of the environment than if you’re exposed to a white face," she said. Her work has carried over to criminal justice. She found that death row defendants were twice as likely to receive a death sentence if they looked "stereotypically black" than if they did not. In light of her discoveries, Eberhardt is working with police forces "to design interventions to improve policing and to help them build and maintain trust with the communities they serve," the MacArthur Foundation says.

Parenting As A Gen Xer: What It’s Like To Be The First Generation Of Parents In The Age Of IEverything - The Washington Post
It struck me recently, after one of my quiet carpool rides, that my generation of parents – we of the soon-to-be or recently 40 year old Gen X variety, the former latchkey children of the Cold War and an MTV that actually played videos, former Atari-owners who were raised by the the Cosby Show and John Hughes, graduated high school with the kids from 90210, then lumbered through our 20s with Rachel, Ross, Chandler, Monica, Phoebe, and Joey and flip phones – is perhaps the last to straddle a life experience both with and without the Internet and all its social media marvels. After all, I didn’t even learn to use e-mail until I was 19 and a sophomore in college in 1993, and only for a slightly cringe-worthy reason: a cute boy at another college asked me to e-mail him. My generation, it seems, had the last of the truly low-tech childhoods, and now we are among the first of the truly high-tech parents.

Jenny Prinn Via Miss Moss

The Complicity Cost Of Racial Inclusion | Al Jazeera America
For the past 50 years, Asian-Americans have been the so-called model minority — the minority group held up by politicians and the media to demonstrate the potential for success for people who aren’t white. It is no coincidence that this narrative arose alongside the black power movement in the 1960s. Asian-American success over time became a rhetorical bludgeon used to deny the real and ongoing effects of institutional racism and white supremacy on African-Americans. Ronald Reagan, for example, called Asian-Americans “exemplars of hope and inspiration” while denouncing black women on welfare. The existence of Asian-Americans was a way to deny the significance of whiteness and the hardship of exclusion from it.

Randy, Red, Superfreak And Julia: Scandal Season 4 Premiere Recap | Awesomely Luvvie
Now, we all know Olivia and Fitz will make their way back to each other. It’s just a matter of how long it’ll take. As a bandwaggoner shipper for them, I can’t make up my mind on whether I want this to happen or not. Sometimes, they annoy me to no end and then other times, their bomb chemistry has me rooting for “one minute.” IDK. We shall see. All I know is that I don’t want Olivia being some crumbling mess next to him. THAT IS ALL I KNOW! And Jake? Well, he’s the king, President, CEO and Executive Director of the Friend Zone. Bless his heart.

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